The sun-a tree-fog

Dear friends!

The start of a new year takes you a step closer to attainment of your goals and wishes. Hope you make good use of your effort and both your goals  and dreams  finnaly turn into reality in  2018.

 

It is a pleasure for us to introduce you  a new cathegory this year: POEMS.

Well, please your senses with the first one below. :-)

Hello!
Once upon a time there were two girls who enjoyed writing poetry. As their style and topics were so diametrical an idea came into their minds.  Collaboration happened and they created poems which contained the same three words: The sun, a tree and fog. Here it is!!!

Surrounded by fog
not a living creature to see
just the sound of your heart
not beating for me
for someone else, for none
right now it’s my only way out
I can feel the warmth of your echo
it’s like the Sun peeking beyond a cloud
now I have two options
I can stay and root here like a tree
or I can blindly follow my dreams
so, what’s it gonna be?

 

the sun is teasingly;
harsh-faced but honeyed
tickles wooden skins cuddles us via the vacuum
oh we so like it – just trees
we flirt giggle grow
she shall arrive low
for us solely
she shines for us – an ability to turn insides inside out
shines for us – on the tip of my mind you stealthily are
and tongue-tied i’m loving you
shines for us – shallow eyes don’t sob for the absence of you
do at nights
i so like it – the whole the overall the fashion me fog
rooted into the Mother
ask her as to how undress myself enough
happen to hot, satisfying and delicious
for the nights
i stand at the top of films of flesh as
Mother ruffles my roots and emanates:
„hollow out yourself“

 

Kristína Záhradníková, Veronika Gregoriková II.C

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An interview with an exchange student from Brasil

 

As you have probably noticed, we have an exchange student in our schools since September.

We made an interview with her for you!

Tell us something more about yourself, please.

My name is Luiza Taube Toretta and I´m 17 years old. I live in Brazil, Parma, Cascavel.

I´m in the last year of school in Brazil.

Is this your first exchange stay?

It´s the first time I left my country and I live somewhere that is not my hometown.

Why did you decide that you want to study abroad?

I had heard many experiences from my cousins ​​and my brother who made exchange. When they came back they changed a lot and had many experiences and stories to tell.

How long will you be here?

I’m going to stay here for 10 months.

What was the main reason you chose Slovakia?

I was on the waiting list and I had the choice between Slovakia and one other country and I chose Slovakia.

What do you expect from this stay ?

I would like to learn more about the culture here and to be able to come back with experiences and knowledge ​​that I can tell to my friends and family.

What do you like the most here in Slovakia?

I believe that for now – people.

Do you like Slovak nature ?

I like it. I come from a country that also has many natural beauties, but it’s nice to see the differences and that is beautiful in the same way.

Do you like Slovak food  ?

The food is very different, there are things that I like but I have not tasted many traditional things yet.

What is the biggest difference between life in Slovakia and Brasil?

There are many differences, from food to when we eat, or that we treat peple more informally, or that the younger ones have less freedom …

How do you spend your time here when you are not at school?

I’m going to start drawing class, but usually I’m painting or I’m going out with someone.

 

Patrícia Zekuciová (4.C)

 

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ART and ME

by Andrea Kanóczová, 3.A

 

My favourite kind of art has always been drawing.

I enjoy almost everything about it. The colour, the smell, the sound of the top of the pencil sliding on the surface of paper… I don´t practice this hobby very often, but when I do it always makes me feel relaxed and happy.

I was introduced to drawing when I was very young. My grandmother found me decorating my crib with my cousin´s crayons and it inspired her to buy me a set of colourful pencils. Since then my mom would often draw silhouettes of things I liked for me to colour them.

As I was growing older I started attending dance classes, but this was not my cup of coffee. I soon realised that what I like about dancing is not the dance itsself, however, the way it looks from the perspective of the viewer.

I never tried to play any musical instruments, bacause I was unable to decide which one´s sound I like the most. Nevertheless, I listen to music daily. I have no favourite genre. I like everything that sounds good to me or has an interesting message. One day I would also like to see a musical or an opera. The only reason I haven´t done it so yet is that I hugely dislike wearing formal clothes which are expected to be worn  on such occassons.

To summarize, I can say that I do like art. I have always beeen an admirer of skilled people who work hard and put their hearts into the creation of something beautiful. No matter if they are musicians, filmmakers, poets or painters.

 

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World Vegetarian Day

For the celebrations of the World Vegetarian Day, we decided to prepare a talk about vegetarianism, closely related to why we, personally, became vegetarians.

Meat. For most of us the main part of our menu. But at some point in our history it has totally lost its necessity in our diet. So, is vegetarianism good or not? Let us have a look.

People love their food. And when it comes to their eating habits they think of the taste of the portion and the nutrition but they  forget to  think about the consequences. They are simply selfish and the only life they care about is the one they live. Just because we are on the top of the food chain (we could also argue about that), it does not mean we are the ones to decide whose life is more valuable. That is why we have decided to live our lives cruelty-free. But the animals suffering is not the only reason, let us show you some other reasons why we became vegetarian:

  • The meat on the market is full of antibiotics, so by avoiding it you can lower the possibility of getting food poisoning.

  • The conditions that animals are born and raised in are terrible. Animals live in hundreds in small and dirty cages. During their lives, they have to travel long distances without access to food and fresh water.

  • Meat consumption is rapidly increasing every year, which leads to massive increase of carbon dioxide and methane in the atmosphere.

  • Cattle needs large fields to be raised on and their consumption leads to deforestation. Therefore, eating meat is not the truly ecological thing to do.

  • 1/3 of meat bought by an average family is wasted and thrown away.

 

As vegetarians, we know we can‘t (and don’t) force people to vegetarianism, but we are still often the victims of mean comments….

,, Without meat you don´t have enough protein to grow and you have lack of vitamins“ Actually, we are perfectly healthy because there are many alternative ways to get healthy nutrients. By eating plenty of fiber and protein from legumes you can make your diet as nutritious as any meatlover´s.

 

,,It´s not a lifestyle, you are just picky and spoiled“ We have our own brains and we have right to make our own decisions. We don´t judge you for eating corpses.

 

,,If you love animals so much, why do you eat their food? You are not a rabbit“ The energy needed to grow vegetables is much lower than the energy used to raise a whole cow. Anyway, you shouldn’t worry about the rabbits. Their lives are not dependent on human-grown crops.

 

To sum it all up, we can all live our lives the way we want to, but as modern and intelligent beings we should know that we are responsible for our actions. Your body is a temple, not a tomb. With meat or without it, we all should try to live according to that.

 

Thanks for reading.

Picture from: https://mznr.montgomery-group.com/

Article by: Stanislava Šimková, Lenka Lormanová, 2.C

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The IIHF U18 World Championship 2017 – interview with Adam Žiak

As you probably noticed, our town in cooperation with Poprad hosted this years‘ U18 World ice hockey Championship. A part of the Slovak team was also Adam Žiak, a student of our school, whom we decided to make a short interview with.

 

Tell us something about yourself..

My name is Adam, I am 17 and I live in Spišská Nová Ves. These days I am in the third grade of our school.

 

How did you get into hockey?

When I was at elementary school , one of my classmates started to play hockey and I wanted to try it too. So I went on to attend my first training. I have never regretted it, because even now, after nine years I still play and enjoy it.

 

For which clubs have you played in your career? Which one do you like the most?

My first club was HK SNV, where I started and played for 5 years and then I went to play for HK Poprad, where I am now.
I like playing for Poprad more, because I have already won four important tournaments there, one of them being the Slovak National Championship in 2016.

 

What are your biggest goals that you want to achieve in your career?

One of my biggest goals is to play in a foreign country, but I still don´t know where. Until now, I have played against clubs from Switzerland, Ukraine and many others, but one time I would love to play for such a club myself.

 

Do you have any “dream” clubs, where you would love to see yourself playing in the future?

That would be surely Chicago Blackhawks, or from Europe probably Örebro in Sweden.

 

What do you plan for summer?

I don’t know, but I am probably going to spend it in Spišská, because of school, obviously, and even my personal coach is from here, so I will have to adjust.

 

Did I hear school? How is it between you and school?

Somehow, I manage to cope up. (laughs)

 

What about the latest World Championship, where you played? 

So firstly, I was very glad that I was chosen, because I had to attend qualifying games in Piešťany and in Poprad, where our coach chose 4 lines of 5 players to play at the championship. Luckily, I was in one of them. During the championship itself, we played 4 games baseline and we qualified for the quarter-finals, where we lost to Russia.
Would you like to earn a living by playing hockey in the future?

I would be very glad if I could.

 

Thanks for your time and we’ll keep our fingers crossed for your next games!

Thank you as well

Adam in action

 

 

 

-Interview by Lenka Plichtová & Alexandra Čupáková

 

 

 

 

 

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“Hallo, hello, bonjour” … or the 3rd International chemistry workshop of Clausthal-Zellerfeld

Hallo, hello, bonjour, or shall I just say.. well, greetings everybody, I am Peter, and in the next few lines I would really love to share with you a few ideas of mine that came straight up to my mind when I was given the opportunity to represent the 3rd ICW of CLZ by way of this report.

Chemistry can be fun...

Firstly, let me just give you a quick insight to what I’ve been (and will be) talking about right here – the ICW. The ICW (International chemistry workshop in Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany) is a educationally-oriented meeting of high school students interested in chemistry and this year it took place from 19 of February to 25 of February.  It is organized by Robert-Koch-Schule in CLZ and Technical University of Clausthal and as the word workshop already says, the meeting is closely connected with the participants being interned in the practical processes of creating actual things, in addition to getting new theoretical knowledge. What that basically means is that we were given a whole lot of opportunities in terms of widering our practical skills in the fields of chemistry, which is a great thing, considering you don’t get that just somewhere, right? Of course this isn’t just a thing you get to attend randomly – Clausthal is a twin town of Spišská Nová Ves, and our school has a partnership with the Robert-Koch-Schule in CLZ, which hosts this workshop every year (first 2015), inviting students from partnered school all around the world. That being said, students of our school weren’t obviously the only ones participating –  the workshop also hosted students from Metzingen, Osterode (Germany), L’Aigle (France), Oborniki Ślaskie (Poland) and Kalyani Nagar (India). How exactly my journey started, we’ll get to see in a moment.

As any person, distillation needs attention, or it will feel lonely. Right?

It’s all begun sometime in November, when we were given the information that something like this is happening in a few months, and that was the moment when I knew I would love to attend. So I went on to sign in and some time later, an email with the first information, starting with a multicultural “Hallo, hello, bonjour” (that’s why the title) arrived. Jumping over a few months’ time, we took a 20-hour train journey through 2 countries and at the end managed to accomodate ourselves in the Academy of sports (probably a university dorm, as far as I know). The first day we went on to meet all the people whose names we, until that moment, could only read in the caption of e-mails we received. Our manager, Mr. Franke, came up to be  as expected from the style of writing, a very nice and friendly type of guy who, even against the language barrier, tried to satisfy all our needs and calmly went through any hardships that came out during our stay. In the evening, all the participants met with the lecturers, sponsors and managers of the workshop in a restaurant, where we had dinner. The next day, the real workshop started, as we were introduced to the Institute of Anorganic chemistry, a few hours later also to the Institute of Organic chemistry, where we worked on many different experiments. The first few days were basically in the “nice to meet you all” mood, as we had to adjust to the new environment, get to know all the new people around, etc. That was the times when we actually could see the language barrier, mostly among our teachers, whose desire in chemistry is not always met with desire in foreign languages, and then humorous situations can occur. Similarly, slowly getting into speaking English on a daily basis, I found myself speaking English even to Polish participants, whom a standard Slovak can easily speak Slovak to. My teacher haven’t found it hard to understand and even less difficult to speak to them in Slovak, that wasn’t my case, though. So as I started speaking English to them, that became the language we used in our conversations, even though we live maybe 500 kilometres apart and our languages and very similar. See, that’s how ridiculous the world is. The workshop continued as expected, but we also (undesirably) got to see a bit of the town by way of having to walk everywhere, and when I mean everywhere, the town didn’t have any kind of public transport service so I suppose you can imagine what I mean. Apart from walking, the managers of the workshop also intended on not giving us any free time by any means necessary, so we were, overworked and exhausted, dragged all across the town once to play bowling, antoher time just to have a nice walk in nice evening weather (by nice I mean the typical London-ish “if it doesn’t rain, it rains” which was probably the motto of that week’s weather in Clausthal). A great idea on Tuesday evening was Potluck – a dinner contest in which the participants were expected to prepare their country’s typical meals and present them to the others, eating it all afterwards. We had lots of fun that evening, I must say. On Wednesday, a tour in a chemical company was prepared for us, a very interesting one, as the company was nothing else than Sympatech, which offers services in particle measurement, being a unique one on the market. On Friday night, we had a farewell  Chemistry-show, prepared by our manager, Mr. Franke (otherwise, a chemistry teacher).  We left on Saturday morning, visited Dresden on the way back, and after the long journey, came home, bringing lots of new knowledge, foreign friend contacts, but most importantly lots of new experience on how the things are in foreign countries. I certainly learned a lot, improved my language skills and also had a lot of fun, which is always important. I really loved to be a part of such a programme. To see how it all went, I am attaching a few pictures from the workshop.

Chemist in his natural habitat

And for the end, the whole crew!

 

Peter Hron 3.C

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